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money. and the average person needs that $2,000 in his pocket to drive the economy. saying that tax breaks for the rich drive consumers lower down to spend is like saying you could start your car by pouring gasoline on the hood. there's no proof, there's no factual data to support it. it's completely a sham to say that. >> and he's a business owner. we need more members of congress to sound like that. if the president is trying to achieve solidarity on raising the top tax rate, these are the voices that can come through for them with that message in a big way. an owner of an automobile supply company says she supports the plan even if it means her own personal rates will go up. . >> i would have higher tax rates, but r more important and more crucial, the middle class would be spending about $3,000 more. >> harry reid kept the focus on the president's winning campaign message of letting the tax cuts expire on incomes over $250,000 a year. >> the people who have done so well during this difficult time with the economy, the richest of the rich are going to have to pay a little more to
. >> by growing the economy. just a couple numbers. already in this meager economic recovery, we've increased revenue to the federal government by $344 billion. if we just return to a normal economy, like we had in 2007, under president bush, where proven was 18.5% of our economy, that would raise another $400 billion per year. the president's proposal right now, the highest estimated is $75 billion, a tenth of that. economic growth is 10 finals more effective at raising revenue. the problem with punishing success, the problem with the president's proposal, it will put that economic growth at risk. you know, i think the best question really is, what is the president's plan? show us your plan. this is about returning confidence to the economy. >> greta: a plan to rev up the economy or a plan for spending cuts? >> a plan for reducing the deficit which actually would return certainty to the economy, restore confidence, which would help economic growth. punishing success will not do that. temporary tax increases don't do that as well. >> greta: it's interesting, almost seems like a game of chicke
, it is not a recession, it has been building for decade-sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and the average american to rise. to make the u.s. less competitive, less attractive for business, we go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again because unless we get the economy really moving and growing in a long run, these budget problems will occur over and over again. we have identified eight areas where we find, these things would move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two or three or four years we start to see impact and there's quite bipartisan support. and the sustainable budget compromise. number 2, easing immigration now. we need a broader immigration reform, but it is one of the abilities to move rapidly to inject skill to the economy to fill jobs we badly need to fill to sustain our growth. it is not long term solution to the skill problem in america but a critical step we need to take to move the needle. we have got to simplify and realize the corporate tax code. everybody agrees. we just did a survey that included a loss of members of the general p
, investors in the financial markets and the real economy, you need sustainability and credibility. the problem with the european union for the time being is that decisionmaking is not sustainable. the united states has a common economic area with a common currency. one central bank, one parliament, and one government. the european union has an economic area with one currency, one central bank, and 17 governments in the eurozone. how the fine trust when you have every day after the decision making, another government -- how you can find an investor going to greece, today you invest in euros. tomorrow, the currency of greece, nobody knows. what kind of investment will go to greece. the biggest problem is not to fill the gap in the public coffers of greece. my eyes, it is a credit crunch in some of the countries. i met the chairman of the greek chamber of commerce when i was there and he'd tell me we have about 300 small and middle sized companies. ferry transport is a very important element of the greek economy. in the health-care system, whatever. most of the jobs are created in sm
's really thinking that we're going to get this full 3.5%, 4% gdp hit smack into the economy on january 1st. the problem is that time is marching on. we've had the election, we've had thanksgiving. the excuses are running out. the lame-duck session is only so long. that's probably why the markets are getting nervous. although you may get a deal done in q-1 rather than in q-4, the fact that it actually hits from january 1st is going to keep business very cautious, very defensive and that's going to worry the equity market. >> it's interesting because it also comes against the landscape where we've seen chinese equities underperform, they reminded us very few of its member countries have great growth prospects going forward. that's probably wise. people are saying why is it that across the globe the u.s. fiscal cliff is such an issue. well, it's because sources of growth at this point are few and far between. >> that is the problem. where is growth going to come from. the one place that looked set for a reasonable 2013 was the u.s. economy. europe flat, china slower probably than this year. b
economy and will her job creation in our country. republicans are committed to continuing to work with the president to come to an agreement to avert the so-called fiscal clef. one reason why we believe that we put revenue on the table as long as it is accompanied by serious spending cuts to avert a crisis. we believe this is the president's request for a balanced approach to this issue, and we are going to continue to work with the president to try to resolve this in a way that is fair for the american people. we all now that we have had the spending crisis coming at us like a freight train. it has to be dealt with. in order to try to come to an agreement, republicans are willing to put revenue on the table. it is time for the president and democrats to get serious about the spending problem our country has. i am optimistic. we can continue to work together to avert this crisis, sooner rather than later. >> good morning. last week, the president's chief political adviser indicated that medicare and medicaid are the main drivers of our deficit. i know we have seen this morning als
different elements of our economy deal with d.h.s. with support of others coming up with what would be best business practices and then if those best business practices were adopted by those within that element of the economy, they would get liability protection, liability immunity. now, some say, wait a second. that leads to a slippery slope that the government will come in and crash in on you. i don't know the perfect answer but i can trying for the lightest regulatory approach we could have. and those worried about the federal government coming in heavy-handed are truly concerned about that, they ought to think about this. if we have a successful cyberattack against a part of our critical infrastructure, my fear is that congress and whoever's present at the time will overreact because the public will require it. wouldn't it be better for us to anticipate it? wouldn't it be better for us to get ahead of the crises and then have a means by which we defend against it? we know we're not ever going to be totally 100% successful. so when it happens to diminish the impact on whatever critical i
to the financial system. >> steve, if only the market could focus on just the economy, which actually seems to be chugging along okay. if you look at durables, consumer confidence, the ongoing recovery and housing, it's the overhang of the cliff that's spooking everybody. >> yeah, we've had somewhat better numbers. the new home sales today, not great. maybe sandy affected even though the government said it wasn't. the economy's okay. it may be more of a 2% plus economy in the fourth quarter than is being given credit on the street. it's not gang busters. the question has been for a long time -- by the way, there's some headlines from the beige book. you can see it really did affect the northeast, new york, and new jersey especially. so we'll see some of that in the data in the months ahead. we'll be seeing some rebuilding going on. you know, i would not make a call here on the economy, scott, to say go ahead and invest in the economy. after the fiscal cliff everything is fine. i think there's a reason for cautious optimism, but i don't think there's a reason to think it's going to go gang b
strategy? what do you want to do with your money in the economy does go off the fiscal cliff? >> yeah, we were worried about that back in september, october. so even though we like the equity markets going into 2013, we wanted to hedge ourselves a little bit, so we took money out of equities. didn't just put it into cash. we put it into three areas we think are still good long term. one is we talk about emerging market equities, but i like emerging market debt. these monetary authorities are done tightening. they fought the inflationary problem that they had successfully. they're in hoed. yield curves could shift down. we stress doing it in local currency. the other areas are u.s. high yield, which i still think is valuable. we do think spreads will contract and emerging market equities as well. >> jordan, what about you? how are you preparing for what could be an eventuality where we go over the cliff and we've got to deal with higher taxes and a slower economy? a lot of people expecting recession in 2013, if, in fact, this occurs. >> think about what works well in a slow-growth economy.
that will affect your spending, lifestyles or the economy in any significant way. >> yes, indeed. the president is standing confident standing firm on middle class tax cuts and against any effort by republicans to throw the debt ceiling into the equation. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tieç negotiations to debt ceilg votes and take us to the brink of default once again, as part of a budget negotiation, i will not play that game. >> as the president perfects his steely gaze, keep in mistake he's keeping side eye on splintering cracks appearing amongst congressional republicans' supposedly solid front. >> personally u i know we are to raise revenue. i don't care which way we do it. i would rather see the rates go up than do it the other way. >> let's take the american people out of the line of fire. particularly that 98%. >> maybe there's something in the oklahoma water supply. if republican lawmakers are falling pray to the mendacious middle class those at fox news are standing up for the needs of those persecuted top earners. >> this is a different america. how did w
reserve look, it did not dim the hopes of the bulls. they talk about the economy standing at a measured pace with moderate consumer spending. optimistic and moderate to words they relate. the true standout today. costco with the one-time dividend taking the stock to new highs today. this has been a really beaten-down name up sharply, and coach is looking pretty fashionable as well. look at gold colored one point it was down $35, it is losing some of the shine, oil taking a hit down to a one-week low, budget concerns on crude, and we will see right now what is going on with gold. let's see what they make of the midday reversal. closing higher, just one big year. this unique group and the nymex, this is pretty significant, isn't it? the politicians would open their mouth and the market rallies, that never happens. >> this is really a pretty good rally when you consider where we came from, this is a pretty good move. people are very optimistic maybe he is making true statements they will get something done. honestly the value is very anemic. they were placed in the week after, now we're ki
in the economy that would indicate that the job market is strong enough to actually bring down that overall unemployment rate. earlier this fall weekly jobless claims had dipped below that line, right before the election, and now they seem to be creeping above it, 393,000 is the number that we're hat today. it's interesting to note that we're going to get an overall unemployment number coming out. some people think based on this number that that could go back above 8% as well. bill: we were so keane on these numbers and waiting for them to tell us what they would tell us about the economy, and how voters were thinking and feeling and how it would play out in the election. a lot of people are now saying hey man, wrist the attention on the numbers. job number one is how to maybe the economy stronger. guess who is coming to the white house for lunch? >> mr. president you're entitled as a president to your own aeu own airplane and own house but not to your own facts. bill: those are topics that will likely not come up today. martha: peanut butter and honey is mitt romney's sandwich. we'll see i
on the very, very decent and accelerating fundamentals of the u.s. economy. >> maybe, and that's just today, right, ron? >> been since last week. >> we were talking about the market really being so sensitive to any rhetoric out of washington. >> i'm not saying it's not hostage to headlines. we'll get intraday volatility. from the monday before thank giving until now, we have effectively wiped out the losses we saw post-election. >> rick, how do you see it? market complacency, too much angst, are we overthinking this? how do you read the market right now? >> i think that the low volume movements of the equity markets aren't really telling you any information. there's no way even in aggregate a market could decide what's going on in harry reid or john boehner's brain in anything is going on in begin with. if you look at treasuries overlaid on top of equities, until mr. boehner's comments, the treasuries have taken the big picture on all of this. they're not going anywhere fast. fiscal cliff is important, but there's a lot of issues for the next several years that are going to be important to
starting to hurt the economy, do you agree? >> you see that with the investment spending, and it can only get worse as we get closer to the end of the year as everybody holds their breath in the economy collectively, we have big problems. lori: one thing was the incredible amount of government spending especially on defense. one of the biggest issues is concerning. >> the issue really is what happened in the current quarter and going into the beginning of next year. other types of discretionary spending is as well. the total is $600 billion, the economy simply cannot withstand that sort of shock. we saw a week underlining detail report. know the economy will be soft in the current quarter due in part to hurricane sandy but also the slower trends in the various components. lori: 1.7 is the consensus estimate of expansion, what are you thinking? >> we're forecasting 1.3%. in the ballpark of 1.7 before hurricane made landfall. more of a ceiling than a floor at this point. lori: anything good to look forward to? >> things don't look all that bad next year. one of the key reasons when next you
. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ >> dana: congress 35 days to reach a deal and prevent the economy going over the fiscal cliff. no mystery what the issues are that must be reed. the democrats know, republicans know and so does president obama. entitlements are pushing the country toward financial ruin. here is what the president said in 2010. >> the major driver of the long-term liabilities is medicare, medicaid and healthcare spending. nothing comes close. social security we could probably fix the same way tip o'neil and ronald reagan sat down together and we could figure something out. that is manageable. medicare and medicaid, massive problems down the road. that's where, that is what our children have to worry about. >> dana: here we are, two years later and still no plan. on the left in congress refusing to deal with that simple reality. vermont senator bernie sanders caucuses with the democrats. take a listen. >> i get nervous when i hear the president and others continue to talk about quote/unquote, entitlement reform. which is just another cut for medicaid and medicare and social security. >> er
the company's economy. the damage from sandy was worse than first anticipated. there's 75,000 jobs lost in new jersey and new york. and the $1.4 billion economy is -- in the quarters ahead, in the fourth quart, he sees a quarter to a half point hit to national gdp directly related to the effects of sandy. talking about the national economy, the bright spots include housing and consumer spending, the negatives include business investment along with weak manufacturing. the congress and the administration must address the fiscal cliff. any plan to reduce the deficit should quote start small and then grow very substantially over time. so dudley basically agreeing with the take that sandy is a bigger event, and then you want to add on top of that dudley's concerns about the fiscal cliff coming our way. >> what does this mean for the retailers because right now we have the impact of sandy, because they're confined pretty much to november. we had this seasonally strong period for retail sales especially for the holiday season. but does that mean the kruk -- money is being spent instead on gypsum boar
our economy. how to deal with them in a responsible way, get us passed this fiscal cliff, passed in august, only plan in washington, d.c., to prevent these debilitating tax increases from hitting across all of our family owned small businesses. finally, mr. speaker, h.r. 6365, it's the national security and job protection act. we passed that in september. that's the bill that looks specifically at these coming defense cuts. these cuts that secretary of defense leon panetta has called devastating in their impact. i know you do, mr. speaker, leon panetta, former chief of staff to president bill clinton, former chairman of the democratic-led budget committee here in the u.s. house of representatives, current secretary of defense calls these defense cuts devastating. this u.s. house has passed a proposal to prevent that second round of cuts from taking place. it's the only proposal anywhere in this town to have passed. we did in august. we took care of our business and we have yet to have partnership from either the white house or the senate. on that proposal. we took the sequester r
. it really helps the economy. gerri: or something surprising here. we have a comparison, brightwork state versus nonwhite work state. we just showed weight increases by higher then any nonwhite work state. how is that possible? >> what it does is a big open for business sign to attract businesses to the state. lawmakers in the state are putting workers and job creators about special interests. and they know that they won't have to -- that the politicians won't be putting anyone else ahead of the jobs. gerri: job growth shrinking in the united states. it really does involve michigan. it's what happened with detroit auto workers. their jobs shrinking. they're definitely on the decline. other workers in the south. and there is a clear case study of the power of the work states -- the right to work states. not for those who employ people come up before the workers. >> that is right. the auto industry -- the american auto industry is actually coming back. but it's coming back in the right to work states where we have the very stringent right to work state. all the auto workers are making more
and the economy. we agree with that. but if your number one priority is jobs and the economy, you don't grow the economy and create jobs by raising taxes on small businesses, the very people who create those jobs. >> greta: white house press secretary today jay carney when asked when the next meeting with congressional members would be, the answer was, quote, it would come at the appropriate time. >> nobody knows what that means. >> greta: that's my point. look, all of you have had a vacation, campaigning, doing that for the last three months. you've been about this fiscal cliff for a year and a half. now the president is going out to do, as you say, campaigning. the press secretary says there will be a meeting between leaders at the appropriate time. the appropriate time seems like pretty much right now. >> well, it is. what you're seeing by the president and democrats is an attempt to run out the clock. i think they think they gain leverage if the pressure builds toward the end of the year. frankly you're hearing a lot of prominent democrats saying we should go over the fiscal cliff and le
just return to a normal economy like we had in 2007, those policies of george bush where we had 18.5% of our economy coming to the federal government as revenue, that would be another $419 billion. so combined, that would be $750 billion per year of additional revenue. now, president obama's proposal of punishing success, it's hard to say exactly what it will be, but somewhere around $75 billion. it's a tenth of what we get with economic growth. and the rob with punishing success, with increasing marginal tax rates or really increasing taxes, is you put at risk that growth that is ten times more effective. so again, i'm just looking at what works. and we need to calm the markets. i don't want to play brinksmanship. it's a unfortunate that the president really isn't negotiating in good faith. he's just moving the goal posts. >> although the lead story on the "wall street journal" is about how the president may be relaxing that position. he may not insist on returning to the pre-bush tax cut rates for those wealthiest 2% or whatever the situation is. that may not mean that he's not l
come january 1, and it will be an increaaed tax rate and were soft economy. if we actually pay for the cost of government as we have right now, the cost of government is recession. if you pay the size of government now. we will have recession in this country and that blows people's minds a little bit more. i don't see them being forced. we have all of these year-to-year fixes and patches and delay it here. this whole process is an example of doing that. dagen: you talk about the needing to be different. some people might talk about fixing our debt and deficit problems, but when it comes down to it, they don't want to give up tax rates, pay anymore, and when you talk about cutting government they get up in arms about cutting spending. >> that is definitely true. a few politicians who are talking honestly about this stuff and have been able to win a few elections. people like rand paul might lead it. scott walker of the world, there is a reality we will have to conform to. they're not all being punished at the ballot rocks. we will see a double dip recession and some of the effec
the election, his number-1 priority will be jobs and the economy. we agree with that. but your number-1 priority is jobs and the economy you don't grow the economy to create jobs by raising taxes on small businesses, the people who create the jobs. >> white house press secretary today, jay carney said when he was asked when the next meeting would be, the answer was, it would come, quote at the appropriate time. >> well, nobody know what is that means -- >> no! that's my point. is that -- is that, you know -- look, all of have you had a vacation, i refer, to while you are campaigning the last 3 months. have you known about this fiscal cliff for a year and-a-half. now the president's going out, friday, to do, as you say, campaigning. the press secretary says there will be a meeting between the leaders at the appropriate time. that seems like it's right now. >> it does. to me, what you are seeing with the president and the democrats, is sort of an attempt to run out the clock. i think they think they gain leverage if the pressure builds. you are hearing a lot of prominent democrats saying,
's credibility, and it's important for america's economy and economic growth. that plan has to be balanced and that means significant revenues, and it has to go around. typically that means the wealthy and well off have to pay their fair share as well. again, these are not new issues. they are ones that were debated. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we talked about medical savings through the programs, address rising national expenditure. will have more to say on taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here
in this country. theit has done nothing to stimulate jobs. it has done nothing to take our economy into a better shape. it was the bush tax cuts and the wars that drove us into this huge deficit that we have now. not the republicans' entitlements for this country and then we have neglected this country and the people of this country. we could have created jobs 10 times over. you have vets that are going to be coming back here, and where are the jobs for them? we have focused so much on these wars we got quagmired into, obama has been trying to get us out of them for the last four years. all the republicans have done for the last four years is say no, no, no to any kind of -- and obama has tried to push through bills to cut taxes for job creators, fo. host: for small businesses? caller: yes, for small businesses. host: here is reaction from senator lindsey gramm. he says this -- a republican from new jersey, go ahead. caller: i am calling in reference to this fiscal cliff. at this point, all the seniors are already in trouble. they are not going to get but a little increase. congress will automat
? >> to be a generational buying opportunity. this is based on congressional ineptitude. the fact is the economy has a tail wind, the market is fundamentally attracted, the valuations are reasonable. you have earnings growth. if we can bridge the fiscal cliff and get a comprehensive tax reform and entitlement reform, you would see a market significantly higher. tracy: we have had some earnings that look positively dismal. it is a very big pricey discretionary product, but they miss earnings, that is a real fundamental, isn't it? speak we still have the s&p profit growth that is positive. you cannot continue to have double-digit earnings growth as he diyou did for 10 consecutive quarters. if we get through this cliff in the back half of 13, gdp growth rate accelerates as we anticipate and profit growth as well. tracy: if your liking big multinationals, you don't like europe yet you like the multinationals. help me wrap my mind around that. >> u.s. large caps are cheap, most of those in mall to nationals. but they don't deserve to be cheap. it is going to be a while before you get any sustained growth. you c
're out with a view on your next year that doesn't sound too rosy. you talk about the economy contracting half a percent. challenges in the core countries. so walk us through how important the german vote is tomorrow and whether greece gets its aid as to the more broad brooutlook. >> the outlook is not improving. it's deteriorating for the eurozone. economic fundamentals are getting worse particularly in the countries of germany and france. these are the countries we revise down the most. in the periphery, there are signs that the recession is stabilizing. we're below the consensus. typical view is that the economy will broadly stagnate next year, we think it will continue to shrink and the ecb will continue to cap interest rates and perhaps at shall point the bond buying program will be in spain. >> and so when we talk about the sequence of events that markets are looking for the next couple of months, the main one still seems to be when spain asks for aid. pushed into the first quarter of next year now in your view? >> i think there are two windows of opportunities really. the first one
, that is good news, you saw growth in economy and in the last few moments we moved higher and we are positive for the week. when you check it out and industrials we are up 44 points and most of those names on the dow are in the green, names like hewlett-packard and caterpillar and bank of america and united healthcare doing well. the fiscal cliff headline after headline continues to be in the forefront and on everybody's mind that this is what we are seeing, a decent market and the u.s. dollar being weaker today has been a factor in the strength we are seeing as well. connell: treasury secretary tim geithner meeting with congressional leaders and doing so as we speak. dagen: peter barnes live from capitol hill. peter: treasury secretary tim geithner arriving at our or so ago to hold meetings with top congressional leaders. senate democratic leader harry reid, now he is meeting with house speaker john boehner, that meeting just getting underway, after that meeting with senate republican leader mitch mcconnell and house democratic leader nancy pelosi and with the president and republicans on ra
. in conclusion, the bill will benefit our nation's economy by helping american innovators and businesses better protect their inventions overseas. i urge my colleagues to support the legislation, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from texas. mr. smith: mr. speaker, we have no other speakers on this side. i yield back the balance of my time as well. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass senate 3486. those in favor will signify by saying aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. smith: mr. speaker, i move that the house suspend the rules and pass s. 2367, the 21st century language act of 2012. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: senate 2367, an act to strike the word lunatic from
where substantively republicans believe in things and think certain things are better for the economy and the country, they will be in a weaker position to achieve any of those things. but they have to take into the consideration the idea that everybody's taxes will go up january 1st if there is no deal. it is not going to be all on the president's shoulders. in fact most of might be on theirs temporarily and for good. they have to decide what is the better position. and you know, will the president and the democrats offer them something that they really should take, significant spending cuts? some kind of significant entitlement reform? those are kind of things republicans have been after for a long time. even though there would be grumbling about tax increases on certain income level, that is something they could take home and really savor. this depends where it goes, the brinkmanship continues. david drucker from "roll call." thank you. >> thanks a lot. jenna: well now we turnover seas where we have some new information today on what some say could really be a turning point in the
wealthy americans are the ones who are creating the jobs and helping to turn this economy around. that remains the big sticking point. those bush era tax cuts, white house saying it should be extended for middle class americans but not for those upper income americans, carol. >> how seriously should we take these negotiations? both sides are negotiating in public, not the greatest way to negotiate in the world, right? >> reporter: right. you sort of have to take it based on the information they give you. there's a lot that goes on behind the scenes. we've seen this play out over the last four years where both sides will sort of throw these sharp elbows publicly, but then they do hammer something out. we do have to take it seriously. you have to get a sense that both sides understand the serious nature of this fiscal cliff and they do want a deal to get done. so they are looking for ways to find some kind of agreement. they are looking at outside groups today as well. the president will meet with half a dozen governors, arkansas, minnesota, utah, wisconsin, republican governor fro
interest deduction may be on the chopping block if the economy falls off the fiscal cliff. what does it mean for you and your nation's nascent housing recovery? rodney anderson is the director of supreme lending. welcome, sir. >> good afternoon, lori, rodney, the mortgage interest deduction, on? mous with terms like sacred cow and untouchable but that is changing. >> absolutely. we know several years ago they would have to address the mortgage interest deduction. what we need to remember here is the housing market is already in a troubled stage. ben bernanke last week saying mortgage lending guidelines are overly tight. so we're in an area right now that we know we need to get rid of the deduction but how do we do it? we have to do it structured. lori: let me come in here with this point. are you saying if we get rid of this deduction it could thwart, to your point a very vulnerable recovery? today we got the mortgage apps down 23 years from the prior weeks. new home sales were down when they were expected to rise? >> yeah, it could absolutely hurt the, short term it could hurt it. l
.s. treasury department is now stopping short of labeling the world's second biggest economy a currency manipulator. the white house is expected now to send the congress a multi-billion-dollar request on the recovery from superstorm sandy. the storm caused an estimated $71 billion in damages in new york and new jersey, and some congressional aides saying the request for funding would likely be at least $11 billion. the move comes as canada gets close to its decision on whether to approve the transaction. the energy companies say discussions with the committee are still in progress, and of course they had to file approval because they have extensive operations in the u.s. gulf of mexico. >>> "the wall street journal" reporting that virtue is emerging as the frontrunner to buy knight capital. they would possibly sell off parts of that business. finally, we can't get away from the story of twinkies. the bakers union of hostess brands wants a bankruptcy judge to appoint a chapter 11 trustee to ensure an orderly winddown. the union is saying it objects the allowing incumbent management to su
. again, the economy is doing a little better. the unemployment numbers have been a little better, but what's the impact? >> 2 million people -- >> 2 million would lose. >> -- would lose income. here's the thing. there's a lot of talk of these people are looking or not looking for jobs, they're just taking this check. that's not the case. there's only one job for every three folks looking for a job. so there literally is not a job available for two of those people. so they have this income, unemployment insurance which keeps them in the economy, a functioning part of the economy, so they can spend the money. so the economic policy institute went ahead and extrapolated. if you were to keep this $30 billion cost of extended unemployment insurance, actually, that will pump another $15 billion to $18 billion into the economy because these folks are spending money. and that's what fuels our economy. >> some of the people who argue that we should go off the fiscal cliff, that it will push them to negotiate a sort of more thoughtful deal -- >> right. >> -- they say that it's not a fiscal
of this country's economy. and actually, things are looking up, if you look at -- >> they're not saying that. >> -- the data. >> they're not saying that. i'm saying small business owners will be hurt. >> yeah. >> if you raise taxes. but -- we're talking about compromise. this is my view. you've got your view. you know what the answer is? >> yeah. >> getting together and talking saying, listen, this is what i can live with. you know what? 39.6% is offensive, even raising it 1 percentage point is offensive. why don't we do what warren buffett says and anybody that makes $1 million or more pays 30%, a minimum tax rate of 30%. and you raise the level up to $500,000 instead of $250,000 and i'll go ahead and reluctantly agree to raise the top rate to 37%. that's how deals are done, but you never get there if you don't have a president and congress -- >> but they can't do that now. >> why can't they do that? >> it's the centerpiece of their argument since the campaign and tim geithner on the sunday shows. they say there is no deal about raising taxes on the wealthy. >> and they're right. the matter
hikes and spending cuts, we are getting a new snapshot of our economy. the number of americans seeking unemployment benefits fell last week by 23,000, but the total, 393,000, is still way above where we need to be to bring the unemployment rate down. in fact, our four week unemployment average went up to over 405,000 last week. the report for the whole month is out a week from tomorrow. >>> meantime, a new report finds that the number of americans on food stamps spiked by about 10% last year. that means about 15 million american households got food stamps in 2011, and it is even more profound when you look at what america has and has not created over the past decade. look at this chart. private employment is the line at the very bottom. it's gone down. this is going all the way back to 2002, i think it is? yeah, so look at this. you can see there starts to be a dramatic change around '08, '09. so private employment down, government employment slightly up, medicaid enrollment has soared -- that's what you get that helps folks without a lot of means -- and look at the top line. that repr
the fiscal cliff? >> everybody agrees. >> going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and will hurt job creation in our country. >>er -- every family in america will see their taxes automatically go up at the beginning of next year. >> shepard: so how to avoid that. >> the president and congress will either fail together or we will succeed together. >> there has to be a deal. there has to be an agreement. >> and if they can't come up with a compromise, we are all going to pay the price. plus, they are some of the biggest names in baseball. bonds, clemens, sosa. all three tainted by accusations they used performance enhancing drugs. but should that keep them from cooper's town? tonight, the great debate over baseball's hall of fame ballot but first from fox this wednesday night, the president hopes who have the framework of a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff by christmas. president obama says he would like congress to pass a bill even sooner to extend tax cuts for the middle class families. and he invited some of those middle class americans to the white house today to help make
spending to boost the economy including home mortgage refinancing and the permanent end to congressional control over the debt ceiling. in return, president obama is offering republicans $400 billion in entitlement cuts over ten years. still to be negotiated. mr. obama also wants emergency unemployment benefits and a temporary payroll tax holiday extended along with the infrastructure spending and mortgage relief, the price tag for the president's stimulus bill could rise to $50 billion or more. after meeting with secretary geithner, speaker boehner said he didn't see any sign of compromise from the white house. >> first despite the claims that the president supports a balanced approach, the democrats have yet to get serious about real spending cuts. and secondly, no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. >> eliot: no sooner had boehner finished then senate majority leader harry reid took the podium to challenge republicans to come up w
. it's not going to inject demand into the economy that will create jobs. this is a bad deal all around. what we need is to make a judgment about what we do. does it reduce the deficit? >> joining me now is senator sherrod brown. senator, good to have you with us tonight. your comments on what nancy pelosi has to say about revenue. >> she's right. you look at a little history in the 1990s. the upper one or 2 or 5% were paying more in taxes. just a little bit more. we had 21 million private sector job creation, net job creation. when george bush cut taxes on the wealthy in 2001 and 2003, we've had no real job growth and no wage growth during this past decade. we're finally now after ten straight years of manufacturing job decline hitting places like toledo and cleveland and cincinnati particularly hard, we're seeing now in the last two years after the auto rescue, after we're doing some of the right things here, we're seeing job growth. i agree with what nancy pelosi said. history improves itself. >> so based on history, this is about math and not ideology. the sense i get on the hill to
the summer months where he focused on obama and the economy. i want to talk about, because i can't resist it, it's almost 2013. i think we're well within the bounds. the virginia governor's race. bill bolling, the lieutenant governor, dropped out in twain to make way for bob mcdonnell, currently the governor, dropped out again this week to make way for state attorney jgeneral ken cucinell cucinelli. you have the best friend of bill clinton terry mcauliffe as the democratic nominee. some people are painting this as a tea party against the clintons in mcauliffe. things can still happen. it looks like a fascinating race. >> chris, as you know, political reporters, we only have two gubernatorial races to cover. we give a lot of attention to virginia and new jersey. what's fascinating about virginia, since i've been covering politics on the national stage, the off-year election has proved to be a template if that party that's out of power wins. 2005, tim kaine ends up running a race, appealing to independents, sfresing his religious faith. actually kind of having a very soft appeal to a lot of fo
globally, but here in the united states we're getting answers from the national economy of society and nasa, the guys who put the man on the moon, that's where we're getting our information and where we're getting our policy guidance and the solutions to move forward. let's discuss it, the united states, if we have a carbon tax in the united states of some sort, we tax emissions so we have fewer emissions and you think that makes a really, rail big difference to the temperature of the planet? >> a huge difference because we've got to go after the industrial carbon pollution that's warming the planet and paying a heavy price. this pushed the price tag on the problem and we know where the pollution is, let's go get it. >> one last question, i'm sure you're familiar with the study by the britain's meteorologist office. no increase in the global temperature in a 16 year period. i think it was from mid 1990's until 2010, 2011. and that's what the british office said flat-out. what do you make of that? >> well, with great respect, i'm not familiar with the report. what i can say is here in this c
? >> it's a very bifurcated economy today with the consumer. you have high end consumers that are still feeling pretty good but in very basic every day needs like food as well as basic services, et cetera, people no matter what economic strata they're in, they are trying to save on those basics. >> explains a lot about where we are. >> took my breath away. what he's saying is there's a huge percentage of people trying to pay for dinner and dinner is tough to come by and you forget about that on a fiscal cliff discussion that will be even more difficult for people to pay for dinner and he did this acquisition because he knows people are hurting in this country. >> there's the opening bell. s&p at the top of your screen. here's big board at that. prosperity bank shares marking transfer from the nasdaq and over at the nasdaq. >> you're talking about dinner. we are having discussion about whole foods under pressure of late. the company missed. the cfo resigned. never a good thing for a company when you hear a cfo resigning. stock down 18.25%. smaller cap company. it's 2.9 billion. decent ac
is in terms of how the economy is going to perform and was going to happen to the trajectory of house prices. in environment with strong house prices in this market are generally rising, i agree a very low down payment will accumulate down payment for a reasonably steady income. so the risk of default is manageable and recovered within the premiums. the problem is if we feel we are in an environment of slower economic growth so there's not a lot of wind under this is about which means the possibility you can have recessions is more likely because you're starting for me lower growth rate in house prices that may in fact for a period of time be in a much lighter treasure to read. then i think it is a case or a question about whether the low down payment program is necessarily the best for the borrower when you factor in -- here's where i was a down payment actually does matter because it combination of a borrower if they lose their job and can't make payments being able to sell the house half the loan is really determination of whether you're going to default. if there's a no down payment of p
's comment was look, tax increases slow economic growth. tax increases take resources out of the real economy and allow the government to grow and grow. that's always a bad idea. that's not a good idea some years and a bad idea others. leeches, doctors don't put leeches on people ever, it's wrong. don't do it. it doesn't make people stronger. raising taxes, taking money out of the economy, damages the economy, kills jobs, reduces opportunities. >> you know, the latest cnn polls that just came out this week say you're wrong. two or three americans, including a majority of republicans, say the fiscal cliff should be addressed with a mix, a mix of spending cuts, yes, but also tax increases and if there's no deal according to these polls, they're going to blame republicans more than they blame the president. all the best evidence right now suggests the public wants to see the republicans compromise on this tax question. so from a political standpoint, is it okay for lawmakers to ignore the pledge that they gave earlier? >> well, the challenge is that the pledge that they made and that every two y
't know, feeling better and so much of this is about how we feel about the economy. >> oh, yeah. that's right. investors may not like it, but consumers love it. their confidence, the highest level in many, many months. still below 90, which is really the point at which you see a really strong and robust economy. but the fact that consumer confidence has been doing so much better, it's very important. now, here is possibly a source of their optimism. 20% of consumers expect more jobs in the next six months and that would be a cause for much optimism. >> shepard: yes, it would. the fears about europe's debt crisis clearly eased a bit 'cause there is another deal to provide aid to greece. >> more money for greece, $57 billion. it took three weeks to come to this conclusion for european and global leaders to say hey, we'll give you the money. it will come in four installments and if they didn't get this, they would be in bankruptcy. as you know, that would be bad for the entire e.u. that country, greece, has an unemployment rate of 25%. 25. >> shepard: big number. >> it's a very big numbe
are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with the best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. ♪ guts. glory. ram. we learned today that the president will be hitting the road campaign style to push his plan to raise taxes on income above a quarter million dollars a year. he'll be speaking friday at a factory in pennsylvania. the house speaker john boehner's office today announcing something similar. congressional republicans holding events in washington as well as back in their home districts to frame the president's tax plan as a threat to new hiring. but some republicans as you know are already hinting they're open to eliminating deductions even if it means breaking that pledge that the lobbyist grover norquist has been getting law makers to sign for years. joining us now to talk about it all, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform. grover, thanks very much for coming in. >> good to be with you. >> the trend we're seeing now from members of congress questioning or pushing back on the pledge. we've seen it before to a certain degree, but we're see
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